Confederate Memorial Day 2016

The theme this year for our Confederate Memorial Day service was the story of Major Utz.

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UTZ Camp Initiation Ceremony March 2016

Our Initiation Ceremony for our March Camp Meeting was a great success. We had 36 people in attendance. Now Gimme a Rebel Yell.

UTZ Camp Initiation Ceremony March 2016

National Confederate Flag Day Centralia Missouri

  National Confederate Flag Day

Centralia Missouri 2016

 

National Confederate Flag Day Centralia Battle Field 2016

America’s first slave owner was a black man.

According to colonial records, the first slave owner in the United States was a black man.

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Prior to 1655 there were no legal slaves in the colonies, only indentured servants. All masters were required to free their servants after their time was up. Seven years was the limit that an indentured servant could be held. Upon their release they were granted 50 acres of land. This included any Negro purchased from slave traders. Negros were also granted 50 acres upon their release.

Anthony Johnson was a Negro from modern-day Angola. He was brought to the US to work on a tobacco farm in 1619. In 1622 he was almost killed when Powhatan Indians attacked the farm. 52 out of 57 people on the farm perished in the attack. He married a female black servant while working on the farm.

When Anthony was released he was legally recognized as a “free Negro” and ran a successful farm. In 1651 he held 250 acres and five black indentured servants. In 1654, it was time for Anthony to release John Casor, a black indentured servant. Instead Anthony told Casor he was extending his time. Casor left and became employed by the free white man Robert Parker.

Anthony Johnson sued Robert Parker in the Northampton Court in 1654. In 1655, the court ruled that Anthony Johnson could hold John Casor indefinitely. The court gave judicial sanction for blacksto own slave of their own race. Thus Casor became the first permanent slave and Johnson the first slave owner.

Whites still could not legally hold a black servant as an indefinite slave until 1670. In that year, the colonial assembly passed legislation permitting free whites, blacks, and Indians the right to own blacks as slaves.

By 1699, the number of free blacks prompted fears of a “Negro insurrection.” Virginia Colonial ordered the repatriation of freed blacks back to Africa. Many blacks sold themselves to white masters so they would not have to go to Africa. This was the first effort to gently repatriate free blacks back to Africa. The modern nations of Sierra Leone and Liberia both originated as colonies of repatriated former black slaves.

However, black slave owners continued to thrive in the United States.

By 1830 there were 3,775 black families living in the South who owned black slaves. By 1860 there were about 3,000 slaves owned by black households in the city of New Orleans alone.

Sources:
John Casor
Anthony Johnson

Confederate Memorial Day 2015

Bridgeton Missouri, Confederate Memorial Day 2015

Our keynote speaker this year was Mr. Gale Red, Adjutant of the Lt. George E. Dixon Camp #1962. His subject is very poignant in this day and age of the moral disintegration of America. Titled; “Our Confederate Ancestors are watching”. In S.D. Lee’s “Charge” he states that we are pledged to defend our Confederate ancestor’s good name, to live according to his high moral qualities, and to carry on the principles which made him the ideal person that he was. It is good to be reminded of the high expectations our forefathers had for us.

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Confederate Flag Rallies Draw Thousands From Across The South.

In the aftermath of the TV campaign of hatred against all things Confederate, good folks are outraged at the ongoing attack on their Southern symbols.

From Occidental Dissent

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Splendid news from across Dixie today, as thousands of brave White, and some Black, men and women assembled across several states to demand their heritage and symbols be restored and respected.

The largest rally in Montgomery, Alabama, site of Governor Robert Bentley’s treasonous decision to remove the Confederate flag from the Capitol monument, drew well over a thousand folks, by conservative estimates, and was hailed as a massive success by those organizing the event.

Speeches concerning the attacks on Southern culture and history were given to a rapturous crowd, topped off with a thunderous rendition of “I Wish I was In Dixie” that brought many of those gathered to the point of joyful and patriotic tears.

Other rallies in Tampa, Florida, Harrison, Arkansas, Gastonia, North Carolina, and Columbia, South Carolina drew hundreds more courageous Southern patriots into the struggle, as the waves of discontent over Marxist cultural genocide continue to grow stronger.

This is only the beginning of something far greater, and a sign that a tough and hardy people, bound by ties of blood, faith, and custom, cannot be held down indefinitely by those who wish death and destruction for all.

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Arkansas witnessed an ad hoc awakening on Saturday as well. No retreat, no surrender, no apology.

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Near Tampa, Florida, hundreds of protesters prevented a tiny group of degenerates from burning a Confederate flag.

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A snapshot of some North Carolinians standing up for their heritage and history.

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Utz Camp Confederate Potluck Dinner.

Our January 2015 Meeting and Potluck Dinner was a great success. We are approaching eighty members and are now the largest Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp in the state of Missouri.

If you would like us to help find you a Confederate Ancestor click here.

Below is a picture of some of our camp members receiving Certificates of Appreciation.

Utz Camp Certificates of Appreciation 2015